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One example of how both science and science fiction have begun embracing the inclusion of both genders is Suzanne Collins’ novel The Hunger Games (2008). Collins chose to write the story’s narrator and main character as the female protagonist Katniss Everdeen. In addition to giving the spotlight to a female character, Collins wrote Katniss as an educated and highly skilled archer and hunter, who was selfless and levelheaded in most, if not all, high stress situations. There is an ever-present theme of dystopia in The Hunger Games; this version of dystopia in science fiction centers around the Capitol’s misguided efforts in planning what they believe to be a utopia. This is how Collins includes elements of utopia n the novel by showcasing the Capitol’s privileged few. The social and cultural themes in the novel are best seen in the vast gaps in their class systems and the focus on the evil’s of war.

Star Wars (1977) is another example of social struggles in a science fiction work.). Even though the story takes place in a highly technological society (humans and robots interacting) set in the future, the theme of good versus evil is present throughout all of the Star Wars sequels and prequels (Bowles & Kaplan, 2012). Throughout the series, we see the social morality demise of a young Anakin Skywalker as he transitions into the life he lives as Darth Vader.

Both Star Wars and The Hunger Games incorporate social, cultural and moral dilemmas into the futuristic science fiction genre.

Collins, S. (2008). The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic Press.

Bowles, M. & Kaplan, B. (2012). Science and culture throughout history. San Diego, California: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

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